Cars For a Cure – Donating Your Car to American Cancer Society

Have you ever thought about donating your car to charity? The benefits of charitable car donation are pretty obvious, but with so many charities, which cause do you contribute to? One of the major charitable causes that you can turn your old clunker over to to benefit others is cancer car donation. Some of the biggest organizations contribute the funds they receive from selling scrap car parts to over to help cure various forms, such as breast cancer and lung cancer.

Cars For A Cure Program

The American Cancer Society is a reputable charitable organization where you can trade in your old car as part of the Cars for a Cure Program. Cancer – in its various form – affects millions of Americans each year and there are practically very few families that haven’t been affecting by losing a loved one to this disease. Making a donation means that you’re doing your part in “paying it forward” to save a life.

Donating to Cars for a Cure is not only free, but your donation is also tax deductible. The American Cancer Society uses the proceeds from teach sale for funding for cancer research, education, advocacy and patient services programs. Not only can you donate your old vehicle, but this organization also accepts trucks, motorcycles, RVs, trailers, or even boats. In order to donate, you can head straight to the official American Cancer Society website, fill in your information, and arrangements are made from there to have your vehicle picked up from your home for free. Official instructions and documents are mailed to your home in order to appropriately claim your “gift” for your annual taxes. While some charities accept inoperable vehicles, there are some noted restrictions you need to be aware of before you donate. Your vehicle must have a transferable title, four inflatable tires, and keys that are available to turn over at the time of donation.

Be aware that the law places limits on how much you can claim for tax deduction purposes. Currently the limit you are able to claim is $500 on your taxes. If the gross proceeds from the sale of your vehicle is above $500, you are able to claim that amount. In some cases, the American Cancer Society keeps the vehicle rather than sells it. If this is the case, this organization is required by law to notify you in writing. In most cases, the vehicle is sold, and you will receive an official receipt in the mail listing the gross sale price. Keep this documentation in a safe place because you’ll need it come Tax Time.

Donating a car to charity is definitely a worthwhile cause. There are other companies that can take away your old vehicle for free, but it is definitely worth it to have the satisfaction of knowing that your donation will ultimately help others.

The Aston Martin DB1 Sports Car

The Aston Martin DB1 – A close look at this sports car including performance, technical data, features, comparing rivals, history, used prices

from Classic to Modern

THE CAR

The first sports car from Aston Martin appeared in 1914.

In 1939, the Aston Martin Atom, a two door, four seater coupe was introduced, powered by a 2 litre, four cylinder, SOHC engine, with two Zenith carburettors.

In the early 1940’s, this unit was replaced by a 2 litre, four cylinder, OHV engine, with two SU carburettors, and a compression ratio of 7.25:1.

Linked to a four speed semi-automatic gearbox, this developed 90 bhp at 4750 rpm.

There was independent front suspension, and leaf springs at the rear using Armstrong hydraulic shock absorbers. Production of the Atom ended in 1944.

In 1947, it was decided to design a new car but, by that time, the company was in financial difficulty, and required a cash injection.

History has it that when the industrialist David Brown drove the Atom in 1947, he was so impressed that he purchased the Aston Martin company, having already acquired the Lagonda company.

Using the Atom as a basis, David Brown felt that a convertible or drop head coupe variant, with long sweeping body styling, would be the most appropriate format for the production of the new car.

To withstand the additional stresses encountered by removing the roof section, the chassis would require additional strengthening.

Even though larger, alternative, six cylinder twin cam engines were available from Lagonda, it was decided to retain the same 2 litre unit, as used in the Atom, and fitted with a David Brown four speed, all-synchromesh, manual gearbox.

It had a steel body, with a highly distinctive three part grille, on a steel chassis, with a kerb weight of 1140 kg.

It used Girling 12 inch hydraulic drum brakes all round on 16 inch rims, with worm and roller steering.

An intriguing design feature was the presence of a compartment in one of the front wings in order to store the spare wheel.

The new sports car was designated the Two Litre Sports, and launched at the 1948 London Motor Show, when production would continue until the introduction of the DB2 in 1950, at which point the car would receive the alternative name of Aston Martin DB1.

Unfortunately, the presence of a heavy two seater, drophead-styled body, and an engine with only modest output, made for a car that was underpowered, which was reflected in the fact that only 13 units of the DB1 were built.

Furthermore, the chassis was only suitable for a limited production run, which meant that the car was expensive to produce, and hence not a profitable venture.

THE ASTON MARTIN SPA CONVERTIBLE

Prior to the launch of the DB1 sports car, it was decided that, as a means of thoroughly testing the chassis and engine, the car would be entered in the 1948 Belgian Spa 24 Hour race.

The existing body was replaced by a special version based on a small two seater convertible.

As a result, the car won the race outright, and was duly designated the Spa car.

After the race, this car was rebuilt, and displayed alongside the DB1 at the 1948 London Motor Show.

However, this single Spa Replica, as it was known, failed to produce sufficient interest to warrant actual production, and was subsequently exhibited at the Dutch Motor Museum.

COMPETITION

The market in which the Aston Martin was pitched included the following sports cars: Triumph 2000, Cisitalia 202 SMM Spider Nuvolari, Bristol 401, and Maserati A6.

This concludes my Aston Martin DB1 Sports Car Review.

The Ferrari 360 Modena Sports Car

The Ferrari 360 Modena – A close look at this classic sports car’s performance, technical data, features, comparing rivals, history, used prices.

From Classic to Modern:

THE CAR

The 360 Modena sports car was introduced by Ferrari in 1999, and named the car after the town in which the company’s founder was born.

With a launch price of $140,000, the 360 replaced the successful 355 Series, and consisted of the two seater Modena Berlinetta coupe, the Spider convertible, and the Challenge variant.

Unlike the 355 which was fitted with a steel chassis, the 360 featured a new, slightly larger, aluminium space frame chassis, which benefited from the fact that it was up to 40% stronger, and yet was still some 100 kg, or 25%, lighter.

With styling once again in the hands of Pininfarina, there was a move towards softer lines, and included the removal of the pop-up headlights, whose demise was signalled in the 355.

The cabin of the 360 was much more spacious than that in the 355 Series owing to the increased dimensions of the aluminium chassis, and the interior was fitted with leather trim.

Amongst the optional extras were carbon fibre seats, and a racing exhaust system.

In terms of fuel consumption, it registered 13 mpg in the city and 19 mph on the highway.

The body panels were made from aluminium, and it used vacuum assisted 13 inch vented disc brakes all round and linked to ABS, plus coil spring four wheel independent suspension.

Air from the front ducts flowed below the under-tray to the two diffusers at the rear, and this produced a down force which gradually increased as the car accelerated. In this way, road holding was radically improved.

Dry sump lubrication was retained, as was a five bearing crankshaft, ASR traction control, and limited slip differential.

The dampers had their own electronic control unit to manage vertical or horizontal movement in the car.

By the time production ended in 2005, a total of 8,800 units of the Ferrari Modena sports car had been built.

THE ENGINE

Each of the 360 Series sports cars shared the same larger 3.6 litre, DOHC, mid-engined, rear wheel drive, V8 unit, with five valves per cylinder which, like the 355, utilised lightweight internal components, such as titanium con rods.

It was fitted with a flat-plane crankshaft to prevent uneven firing and timing issues experienced when using a cross-plane unit.

It developed 395 bhp at the redline of 8500 rpm, and 275 ft/lbs of torque at 4750 rpm, the majority of which was available around 3000 rpm.

The compression ratio remained at 11:1, it continued to use electronic fuel ignition, and was fitted with the latest Bosch ME 7.3 engine management system.

Linked to a six speed, all synchromesh, manual gearbox, or the optional F1-style paddle gear shift unit, it produced a top speed of 189 mph, and a 0-60 mph time of 4.2 secs.

The optional system had two paddles behind the steering wheel such that the right paddle changed up a gear, whist the left one changed down, with each gear change taking a mere 150 milliseconds.

With no clutch pedal, the electronic control unit in the gearbox managed the gear changes when matched to the engine revs.

COMPETITION

Typical competition for the Ferrari 360 Modena sports car included the following: Porsche 996 GT2, Aston Martin V12 Vanquish, and TVR Tuscan S. Ferrari performance:

SPORTS CARS FOR SALE

On the second hand market, a Ferrari 360 Modena, in good condition, would sell for around $60,000, whilst an immaculate example would command around around $100,000.

One of the classic cars from Ferrari.

This marks the end of my Review of the Ferrari 360 Modena sports car